How vital is color to brand identity and marketing campaigns? According to one study, 84 percent of consumers say color weighs more heavily than any other influence to our senses when buying a product.

Why are sale signs bright red? Because red is often a cue for danger, so it draws our attention. Why do almost all social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, Skype, and LinkedIn) utilize blue in their branding? Because blue represents trust, peace, order and loyalty.

Color schemes can establish a brand and require thorough research and reasoning. The following examples highlight three brand identity projects (that EVR designed) with a rationale behind each color palette.

Allegiant Care

Color palette: red, white, blue

Formerly known as Northern New England Benefit Trust, Allegiant Care hired EVR for a brand communications strategy which resulted in a new name, and a new brand identity with new web presence and marketing collateral.

The company offers high quality healthcare benefits to Teamsters, who are part of the bedrock of America’s organized labor force. Choosing red, white and blue – colors most often associated with the American flag – is a key component of the identity of Allegiant Care in connecting the feeling of patriotism that resonates with many Teamsters.

To emphasize the history and connection to the Teamsters, we incorporated a subtle vintage engraving style illustration on the Allegiant Care homepage. The new logo mark gives a nod to the 100 year-old Teamster labor union logo with horses and wagon wheel by using a modern and abstract rendition of the wagon wheel. The use of red in the logotype emphasizes the Care and Rx divisions in each respective logo.

While the traditional shades of red, white and blue served as inspiration, the use of shape, image treatment and typography transform the past into a contemporary aesthetic.

Catholic Medical Center

Color palette: eggplant, orange, blue

Historically, the Catholic Medical Center logo contained an eggplant colored square with the full name of hospital appearing inside the square. EVR designed a new logo with the traditional color and square, but took on a completely new form in naming, shapes and colors.

The existing brand color (eggplant) steps away from feeling old fashioned to a contemporary look with two new complimentary colors introduced. We retained the eggplant to represent an element of the past and history of the CMC brand. In deciding colors complimentary to the eggplant shade, navy gave off too much of a corporate feel, green overpowered and red was too commonly associated with emergencies.

Final color selection included a bright blue and orange, which played well with the purple/burgundy shade of eggplant. The usage of both warm and cool colors in the new design symbolize the new and old coming together. The combination of color in a small grid of four cubes (the negative space between the four cubes create a subtle cross) feels upbeat and progressive, yet grounded as a way to balance the old and the new, the past and the future.

Kairos

Color palette: white, grey, brown

Kairos is a consulting service that provides advice to guide high-wealth families and individuals through life. With Kairos meaning an opportune moment in time, we focused on the spirituality of the process and guidance in a life path. We decided to achieve that feeling through a monochromatic color scheme with neutral earth tones.

The main color of gray appears as layered shades in the logo’s dimensional brand mark. However, there are hints of brown with a white background throughout the new website. We convey a sense of purity and wholeness through white, incorporating gray instills a feeling of calmness and brown offers a feeling of stability and comfort.

The use of color evokes a feeling of simplicity, but also speaks of openness and transparency. A calming feeling is conveyed with photographic imagery of symbolic elements from the earth such as a shell. The delicate use of color in the Kairos brand conveys an understated elegance that speaks of quality.